Can you cut down trees on your property nyc?

New York City is not responsible for trees found or fallen on privately owned properties. Residents can remove trees from their private property without permission from the city.

Can you cut down trees on your property nyc?

New York City is not responsible for trees found or fallen on privately owned properties. Residents can remove trees from their private property without permission from the city. Killing a tree on the city floor is very dangerous. The limbs weaken, can destroy cars and houses when parts fall to rain, and can even kill a pedestrian.

You should be able to determine if the tree is on your property or not using the survey you probably received when you closed. This is usually your front yard, but there are exceptions: if, for example, the city includes the widening of your street in its master plan; they may already own “your front”, but they give you temporary use of it until they actually expand the street. The survey you commissioned before the closure should tell you what your land is and what the city's land is. The Borelli bill requires that the number of inches of caliber of replacement trees not exceed twice the number of gauge inches removed in the R1, R2 and R3 zoning districts, which represent a large portion of Staten Island's residential zoning districts.

Citizen Certified pruners, trained to prune light trees by Trees New York, are authorized to prune small branches that can be reached from the ground. Adjacent owners may want to plant trees and work on the trees on the public right-of-way adjoining their property. So, your tree may only be 3-4 feet away from your property boundary, but if this tree were aligned against the property farthest from the block, would it be on a city property or a private owner? I had the same situation, and a house on my block was about 15 meters away, and it turns out that the city considered anything within that 15-meter urban property. When registering the site of a tree stump, the location is also added to the list of possible sites for the city to plant new trees.

To make matters worse, the Parks Department determined that the tree was dead and that it should be removed six months after the construction of the house. This includes sidewalk trees located in front of private residences, including an area less than 50 feet from the tree.